For most of us to move up in the fashion industry, we need to go through a lot of schooling, terribly tiring internships and a lot of rejection.  However, if you’re someone like say, Rihanna, you pretty much just have to wear clothes to make it big in the industry.

Case in point? The 26-year-old singer has been named the creative director of Puma. According to Women’s Wear Daily, RiRi will be overseeing the women’s section of the brand. Rihanna has already flown to Germany to meet with Puma’s design team, pick out colors and create a clear direction for the line. This move is quite the feather in Rihanna’s cap, but it’s also really impressive for Puma. Sales for the activewear brand have been down, but we’re sure her celebrity status will help boost that. “Signing Rihanna is a fantastic step for Puma,” said Puma’s chief executive officer Bjørn Gulden. “Her global profile, her charisma and individuality, her ambition – all these things make her a perfect ambassador for our brand. With a strong portfolio in football, running and motorsport, finding an inspiring partner for women’s training was very important. Rihanna was a natural choice for us. We’re delighted to have her as a partner, and we’re looking forward to what’s to come.”

Rihanna took to Instagram and Twitter to announce the big news.

A photo posted by badgalriri (@badgalriri) on

Now, we think this position is great for Rihanna, she has an amazing fashion sense and even won the CFDA Style Icon Award. However, this doesn’t mean she’ll be very hands on with the brand. Most of the time, these celebrity “creative directors” are just high-profile brand ambassadors. Yet for some reason, we think Rihanna will be pretty involved, after all, it’s her name on the line.

Head over to Women’s Wear Daily for more information.

What do you think of Rihanna’s new position?

Michelle Manetti is a graduate of Pace University and has a degree in Communication Studies with a concentration of Media Studies. She met Marc Jacobs in an elevator once. She also believes that yoga, Liquiteria and a Hunter Thompson book could save the world.

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