We all know that photoshop is used for nearly every photo shoot. Whether the model is posing in magazine or for an advertisement, chances are he or she has been retouched. Usually, we see wrinkles go bye-bye, cellulite disappear and small imperfections fade.

However, according to Elizabeth Moss, founder of Rare Digital Art, a high-end retouching boutique, models are photoshopped much, much more than that. Moss released time-lapse videos showing just how long and how much models are really photoshopped. In the videos, we see eyeballs get bigger, hairlines get longer, fingers get slimmer and teeth get straighter.  In some cases, pores are even added to models. “I know that most people viewing advertising are aware of the skin retouching and body shaping, but I wanted to show some of the other little things that they probably didn’t realize were being done,” Moss told TODAY.

It can take a photographer or designer six hours to make the full transition. And although, what we see in the videos are pretty shocking, Moss said that photoshop isn’t always so dramatic. Sometimes it’s needed because lighting makes models look completely different in photos than they do in person.

But there is a key point she hopes everyone takes away. “I hope that young people understand that what they see in magazines should not be setting a beauty standard for them to try to achieve,” she said. “Even without retouching, models make up such a minuscule percentage of the world population it’s crazy to compare yourself to them. Then they have makeup, stylists, the best photographers, and people like me spending days to make the beautiful look even more beautiful. How could anyone expect to obtain that?”

Head over to TODAY to read more, and be sure to check out the videos below!

What do you think of these videos fromElizabeth Moss?


Michelle Manetti is a graduate of Pace University and has a degree in Communication Studies with a concentration of Media Studies. She met Marc Jacobs in an elevator once. She also believes that yoga, Liquiteria and a Hunter Thompson book could save the world.

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